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FDA Drug information

Ziprasidone Hydrochloride

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Marketing start date: 18 Jun 2024

Summary of product characteristics


Adverse Reactions

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS Commonly observed adverse reactions (incidence ≥5% and at least twice the incidence for placebo) were: Schizophrenia : Somnolence, respiratory tract infection. ( 6.1 ) Manic and Mixed Episodes Associated with Bipolar Disorder: Somnolence, extrapyramidal symptoms, dizziness, akathisia, abnormal vision, asthenia, vomiting. ( 6.1 ) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Aurobindo Pharma USA, Inc. at 1-866-850-2876 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Clinical trials in adults for oral ziprasidone included approximately 5700 patients and/or normal subjects exposed to one or more doses of ziprasidone. Of these 5700, over 4800 were patients who participated in multiple-dose effectiveness trials, and their experience corresponded to approximately 1831 patient-years. These patients include: (1) 4331 patients who participated in multiple-dose trials, predominantly in schizophrenia, representing approximately 1698 patient-years of exposure as of February 5, 2000; and (2) 472 patients who participated in bipolar mania trials representing approximately 133 patient-years of exposure. An additional 127 patients with bipolar disorder participated in a long-term maintenance treatment study representing approximately 74.7 patient-years of exposure to ziprasidone. The conditions and duration of treatment with ziprasidone included open-label and double-blind studies, inpatient and outpatient studies, and short-term and longer-term exposure. Adverse reactions during exposure were obtained by collecting voluntarily reported adverse experiences, as well as results of physical examinations, vital signs, weights, laboratory analyses, ECGs, and results of ophthalmologic examinations. The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse reaction of the type listed. A reaction was considered treatment-emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy following baseline evaluation. Adverse Findings Observed in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials with Oral Ziprasidone The following findings are based on the short-term placebo-controlled premarketing trials for schizophrenia (a pool of two 6-week, and two 4-week fixed-dose trials) and bipolar mania (a pool of two 3-week flexible-dose trials) in which ziprasidone was administered in doses ranging from 10 to 200 mg/day. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short Term-Placebo-Controlled Trials The following adverse reactions were the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ziprasidone (incidence of 5% or greater) and not observed at an equivalent incidence among placebo-treated patients (ziprasidone incidence at least twice that for placebo): Schizophrenia trials (see Table 11) Somnolence Respiratory Tract Infection Bipolar trials (see Table 12) Somnolence Extrapyramidal Symptoms which includes the following adverse reaction terms: extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, dystonia, dyskinesia, hypokinesia, tremor, paralysis and twitching. None of these adverse reactions occurred individually at an incidence greater than 10% in bipolar mania trials. Dizziness which includes the adverse reaction terms dizziness and lightheadedness. Akathisia Abnormal Vision Asthenia Vomiting SCHIZOPHRENIA Adverse Reactions Associated With Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Oral Ziprasidone Approximately 4.1% (29/702) of ziprasidone-treated patients in short-term, placebo-controlled studies discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with about 2.2% (6/273) on placebo. The most common reaction associated with dropout was rash, including 7 dropouts for rash among ziprasidone patients (1%) compared to no placebo patients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8) ] . Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More Among Ziprasidone-Treated Patients in Short-Term, Oral, Placebo-Controlled Trials Table 11 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks) in predominantly patients with schizophrenia, including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ziprasidone and for which the incidence in patients treated with ziprasidone was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Table 11: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reaction Incidence In Short-Term Oral Placebo-Controlled Trials – Schizophrenia Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System/Adverse Reaction Ziprasidone (N=702) Placebo (N=273) * Extrapyramidal Symptoms includes the following adverse reaction terms: extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, dystonia, dyskinesia, hypokinesia, tremor, paralysis and twitching. None of these adverse reactions occurred individually at an incidence greater than 5% in schizophrenia trials. ** Dizziness includes the adverse reaction terms dizziness and lightheadedness. Body as a Whole Asthenia 5 3 Accidental Injury 4 2 Chest Pain 3 2 Cardiovascular Tachycardia 2 1 Digestive Nausea 10 7 Constipation 9 8 Dyspepsia 8 7 Diarrhea 5 4 Dry Mouth 4 2 Anorexia 2 1 Nervous Extrapyramidal Symptoms* 14 8 Somnolence 14 7 Akathisia 8 7 Dizziness** 8 6 Respiratory Respiratory Tract Infection 8 3 Rhinitis 4 2 Cough Increased 3 1 Skin and Appendages Rash 4 3 Fungal Dermatitis 2 1 Special Senses Abnormal Vision 3 2 Dose Dependency of Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Fixed-Dose, Placebo-Controlled Trials An analysis for dose response in the schizophrenia 4-study pool revealed an apparent relation of adverse reaction to dose for the following reactions: asthenia, postural hypotension, anorexia, dry mouth, increased salivation, arthralgia, anxiety, dizziness, dystonia, hypertonia, somnolence, tremor, rhinitis, rash, and abnormal vision. Extrapyramidal Symptoms (EPS) - The incidence of reported EPS (which included the adverse reaction terms extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, dystonia, dyskinesia, hypokinesia, tremor, paralysis and twitching) for ziprasidone-treated patients in the short-term, placebo-controlled schizophrenia trials was 14% vs. 8% for placebo. Objectively collected data from those trials on the Simpson-Angus Rating Scale (for EPS) and the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia) did not generally show a difference between ziprasidone and placebo. Dystonia - Class Effect: Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups. Vital Sign Changes - Ziprasidone is associated with orthostatic hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9) ] ECG Changes - Ziprasidone is associated with an increase in the QTc interval [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] . In the schizophrenia trials, ziprasidone was associated with a mean increase in heart rate of 1.4 beats per minute compared to a 0.2 beats per minute decrease among placebo patients. Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Premarketing Evaluation of Oral Ziprasidone Following is a list of COSTART terms that reflect treatment-emergent adverse reactions as defined in the introduction to the ADVERSE REACTIONS section reported by patients treated with ziprasidone in schizophrenia trials at multiple doses >4 mg/day within the database of 3834 patients. All reported reactions are included except those already listed in Table 11 or elsewhere in labeling, those reaction terms that were so general as to be uninformative, reactions reported only once and that did not have a substantial probability of being acutely life-threatening, reactions that are part of the illness being treated or are otherwise common as background reactions, and reactions considered unlikely to be drug-related. It is important to emphasize that, although the reactions reported occurred during treatment with ziprasidone, they were not necessarily caused by it. Adverse reactions are further categorized by body system and listed in order of decreasing frequency according to the following definitions: Frequent - adverse reactions occurring in at least 1/100 patients (≥1.0% of patients) (only those not already listed in the tabulated results from placebo-controlled trials appear in this listing); Infrequent - adverse reactions occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients (in 0.1 to 1.0% of patients) Rare – adverse reactions occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients (<0.1% of patients). Body as a Whole Frequent abdominal pain, flu syndrome, fever, accidental fall, face edema, chills, photosensitivity reaction, flank pain, hypothermia, motor vehicle accident Cardiovascular System Frequent tachycardia, hypertension, postural hypotension Infrequent bradycardia, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation Rare first degree AV block, bundle branch block, phlebitis, pulmonary embolus, cardiomegaly, cerebral infarct, cerebrovascular accident, deep thrombophlebitis, myocarditis, thrombophlebitis Digestive System Frequent anorexia, vomiting Infrequent rectal hemorrhage, dysphagia, tongue edema Rare gum hemorrhage, jaundice, fecal impaction, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase increased, hematemesis, cholestatic jaundice, hepatitis, hepatomegaly, leukoplakia of mouth, fatty liver deposit, melena Endocrine Rare hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, thyroiditis Hemic and Lymphatic System Infrequent anemia, ecchymosis, leukocytosis, leukopenia, eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy Rare thrombocytopenia, hypochromic anemia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis, basophilia, lymphedema, polycythemia, thrombocythemia Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders Infrequent thirst, transaminase increased, peripheral edema, hyperglycemia, creatine phosphokinase increased, alkaline phosphatase increased, hypercholesteremia, dehydration, lactic dehydrogenase increased, albuminuria, hypokalemia Rare BUN increased, creatinine increased, hyperlipemia, hypocholesteremia, hyperkalemia, hypochloremia, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypoproteinemia, glucose tolerance decreased, gout, hyperchloremia, hyperuricemia, hypocalcemia, hypoglycemic reaction, hypomagnesemia, ketosis, respiratory alkalosis Musculoskeletal System Frequent myalgia Infrequent tenosynovitis Rare myopathy Nervous System Frequent agitation, extrapyramidal syndrome, tremor, dystonia, hypertonia, dyskinesia, hostility, twitching, paresthesia, confusion, vertigo, hypokinesia, hyperkinesia, abnormal gait, oculogyric crisis, hypesthesia, ataxia, amnesia, cogwheel rigidity, delirium, hypotonia, akinesia, dysarthria, withdrawal syndrome, buccoglossal syndrome, choreoathetosis, diplopia, incoordination, neuropathy Infrequent paralysis Rare myoclonus, nystagmus, torticollis, circumoral paresthesia, opisthotonos, reflexes increased, trismus Respiratory System Frequent dyspnea Infrequent pneumonia, epistaxis Rare hemoptysis, laryngismus Skin and Appendages Infrequent maculopapular rash, urticaria, alopecia, eczema, exfoliative dermatitis, contact dermatitis, vesiculobullous rash Special Senses Frequent fungal dermatitis Infrequent conjunctivitis, dry eyes, tinnitus, blepharitis, cataract, photophobia Rare eye hemorrhage, visual field defect, keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis Urogenital System Infrequent impotence, abnormal ejaculation, amenorrhea, hematuria, menorrhagia, female lactation, polyuria, urinary retention metrorrhagia, male sexual dysfunction, anorgasmia, glycosuria Rare gynecomastia, vaginal hemorrhage, nocturia, oliguria, female sexual dysfunction, uterine hemorrhage BIPOLAR DISORDER Acute Treatment of Manic or Mixed Episodes in Adults Adverse Reactions Associated With Discontinuation of Treatment in Short Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials Approximately 6.5% (18/279) of ziprasidone-treated patients in short-term, placebo-controlled studies discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction, compared with about 3.7% (5/136) on placebo. The most common reactions associated with dropout in the ziprasidone-treated patients were akathisia, anxiety, depression, dizziness, dystonia, rash and vomiting, with 2 dropouts for each of these reactions among ziprasidone patients (1%) compared to one placebo patient each for dystonia and rash (1%) and no placebo patients for the remaining adverse reactions. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More Among Ziprasidone-Treated Patients in Short-Term, Oral, Placebo-Controlled Trials Table 12 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 3 weeks) in patients with bipolar mania, including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ziprasidone and for which the incidence in patients treated with ziprasidone was greater than the incidence in placebo-treated patients. Table 12: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions Incidence In Short-Term Oral Placebo-Controlled Trials – Manic and Mixed Episodes Associated With Bipolar Disorder Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System/ Adverse Reaction Z iprasidone (N =279) Placebo (N=136) * Extrapyramidal Symptoms includes the following adverse reaction terms: extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, dystonia, dyskinesia, hypokinesia, tremor, paralysis and twitching. None of these adverse reactions occurred individually at an incidence greater than 10% in bipolar mania trials. ** Dizziness includes the adverse reaction terms dizziness and lightheadedness. Body as a Whole Headache 18 17 Asthenia 6 2 Accidental Injury 4 1 Cardiovascular Hypertension 3 2 Digestive Nausea 10 7 Diarrhea 5 4 Dry Mouth 5 4 Vomiting 5 2 Increased Salivation 4 0 Tongue Edema 3 1 Dysphagia 2 0 Musculoskeletal Myalgia 2 0 Nervous Somnolence 31 12 Extrapyramidal Symptoms* 31 12 Dizziness** 16 7 Akathisia 10 5 Anxiety 5 4 Hypesthesia 2 1 Speech Disorder 2 0 Respiratory Pharyngitis 3 1 Dyspnea 2 1 Skin and Appendages Fungal Dermatitis 2 1 Special Senses Abnormal Vision 6 3 Explorations for interactions on the basis of gender did not reveal any clinically meaningful differences in the adverse reaction occurrence on the basis of this demographic factor. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of ziprasidone hydrochloride. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Adverse reaction reports not listed above that have been received since market introduction include rare occurrences of the following: Cardiac Disorders: Tachycardia, torsade de pointes (in the presence of multiple confounding factors), [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] ; Digestive System Disorders: Swollen Tongue; Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: Galactorrhea, priapism; Nervous System Disorders: Facial Droop, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonin syndrome (alone or in combination with serotonergic medicinal products), tardive dyskinesia; Psychiatric Disorders: Insomnia, mania/hypomania; Skin and subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Allergic reaction (such as allergic dermatitis, angioedema, orofacial edema, urticaria), rash, Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS); Urogenital System Disorders: Enuresis, urinary incontinence; Vascular Disorders: Postural hypotension, syncope.

Contraindications

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Do not use in patients with a known history of QT prolongation (4.1) Do not use in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction (4.1) Do not use in patients with uncompensated heart failure (4.1) Do not use in combination with other drugs that have demonstrated QT prolongation (4.1) Do not use in patients with known hypersensitivity to ziprasidone (4.2) 4.1 QT Prolongation Because of ziprasidone’s dose-related prolongation of the QT interval and the known association of fatal arrhythmias with QT prolongation by some other drugs, ziprasidone is contraindicated: in patients with a known history of QT prolongation (including congenital long QT syndrome) in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction in patients with uncompensated heart failure Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies between ziprasidone and other drugs that prolong the QT interval have not been performed. An additive effect of ziprasidone and other drugs that prolong the QT interval cannot be excluded. Therefore, ziprasidone should not be given with: dofetilide, sotalol, quinidine, other Class Ia and III anti-arrhythmics, mesoridazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, droperidol, pimozide, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, halofantrine, mefloquine, pentamidine, arsenic trioxide, levomethadyl acetate, dolasetron mesylate, probucol or tacrolimus. other drugs that have demonstrated QT prolongation as one of their pharmacodynamic effects and have this effect described in the full prescribing information as a contraindication or a boxed or bolded warning [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] . 4.2 Hypersensitivity Ziprasidone is contraindicated in individuals with a known hypersensitivity to the product.

Description

11 DESCRIPTION Ziprasidone capsules contain the active moiety, ziprasidone, in the form of ziprasidone hydrochloride salt. Ziprasidone is a psychotropic agent that is chemically unrelated to phenothiazine or butyrophenone antipsychotic agents. It has a molecular weight of 412.94 (free base), with the following chemical name: 5-[2-[4-(1,2-benzisothiazol-3-yl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-6-chloro-1,3-dihydro-2 H -indol-2-one. The molecular formula of C 21 H 21 ClN 4 OS (free base of ziprasidone) represents the following structural formula: Ziprasidone capsules USP contain a monohydrochloride, monohydrate salt of ziprasidone. Chemically, ziprasidone hydrochloride monohydrate is 5-[2-[4-(1,2­-benzisothiazol-3-yl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-6-chloro-1,3-dihydro-2 H -indol-2-one, monohydrochloride, monohydrate. The molecular formula is C 21 H 21 ClN 4 OS · HCl · H 2 O and its molecular weight is 467.42. Ziprasidone hydrochloride USP is a white to slightly pink powder. Ziprasidone capsules USP are supplied for oral administration in 20 mg (blue/off-white), 40 mg (blue/blue), 60 mg (off-white/off-white), and 80 mg (blue/off-white) capsules. Ziprasidone capsules USP contain ziprasidone hydrochloride USP, ethyl cellulose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized starch (maize). The empty hard gelatin capsule shells also contain gelatin, sodium lauryl sulfate, and titanium dioxide. In addition the 20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg capsule shells contain FD & C Blue 2. The capsules are imprinted with edible ink containing black iron oxide, potassium hydroxide, shellac and strong ammonia solution. Meets USP Dissolution Test 2. Chemical Structure

Dosage And Administration

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Administer capsules orally with food. Do not open, crush, or chew. ( 2.1 ) Schizophrenia: Initiate at 20 mg twice daily. Daily dosage may be adjusted up to 80 mg twice daily. Dose adjustments should occur at intervals of not less than 2 days. Safety and efficacy has been demonstrated in doses up to 100 mg twice daily. The lowest effective dose should be used. ( 2.2 ) Acute treatment of manic/mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: Initiate at 40 mg twice daily. Increase to 60 mg or 80 mg twice daily on day 2 of treatment. Subsequent dose adjustments should be based on tolerability and efficacy within the range of 40 to 80 mg twice daily. ( 2.3 ) Maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder as an adjunct to lithium or valproate: Continue treatment at the same dose on which the patient was initially stabilized, within the range of 40 to 80 mg twice daily. ( 2.3 ) 2.1 Administration Information for Ziprasidone Capsules Administer ziprasidone capsules orally with food. Swallow capsules whole, do not open, crush, or chew the capsules. 2.2 Schizophrenia Dose Selection Ziprasidone capsules should be administered at an initial daily dose of 20 mg twice daily with food. In some patients, daily dosage may subsequently be adjusted on the basis of individual clinical status up to 80 mg twice daily. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 2 days, as steady-state is achieved within 1 to 3 days. In order to ensure use of the lowest effective dose, patients should ordinarily be observed for improvement for several weeks before upward dosage adjustment. Efficacy in schizophrenia was demonstrated in a dose range of 20 mg to 100 mg twice daily in short-term, placebo-controlled clinical trials. There were trends toward dose response within the range of 20 mg to 80 mg twice daily, but results were not consistent. An increase to a dose greater than 80 mg twice daily is not generally recommended. The safety of doses above 100 mg twice daily has not been systematically evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] . Maintenance Treatment While there is no body of evidence available to answer the question of how long a patient treated with ziprasidone should remain on it, a maintenance study in patients who had been symptomatically stable and then randomized to continue ziprasidone or switch to placebo demonstrated a delay in time to relapse for patients receiving ziprasidone capsules [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] . No additional benefit was demonstrated for doses above 20 mg twice daily. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment. 2.3 Bipolar I Disorder (Acute Mixed or Manic Episodes and Maintenance Treatment as an Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate) Acute Treatment of Manic or Mixed Episodes In adults oral ziprasidone should be administered at an initial daily dose of 40 mg twice daily with food. The dose may then be increased to 60 mg or 80 mg twice daily on the second day of treatment and subsequently adjusted on the basis of tolerance and efficacy within the range 40 mg to 80 mg twice daily. In the flexible-dose clinical trials, the mean daily dose administered was approximately 120 mg [see Clinical Studies (14.2) ] . Maintenance Treatment (as an adjunct to lithium or valproate) Continue treatment at the same dose on which the patient was initially stabilized, within the range of 40 mg to 80 mg twice daily with food. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment [see Clinical Studies (14.2)] .

Indications And Usage

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Ziprasidone capsules are indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia, as monotherapy for the acute treatment of bipolar manic or mixed episodes, and as an adjunct to lithium or valproate for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. When deciding among the alternative treatments available for the condition needing treatment, the prescriber should consider the finding of ziprasidone’s greater capacity to prolong the QT/QTc interval compared to several other antipsychotic drugs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] . Prolongation of the QTc interval is associated in some other drugs with the ability to cause torsade de pointes-type arrhythmia, a potentially fatal polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and sudden death. In many cases this would lead to the conclusion that other drugs should be tried first. Whether ziprasidone will cause torsade de pointes or increase the rate of sudden death is not yet known [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] Schizophrenia Ziprasidone capsules are indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ] . Bipolar I Disorder (Acute Mixed or Manic Episodes and Maintenance Treatment as an Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate) Ziprasidone capsules are indicated as monotherapy for the acute treatment of adults with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder [see Clinical Studies (14.2)] . Ziprasidone capsules are indicated as an adjunct to lithium or valproate for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults [see Clinical Studies (14.2)] . Ziprasidone hydrochloride is an atypical antipsychotic. In choosing among treatments, prescribers should be aware of the capacity of ziprasidone capsules to prolong the QT interval and may consider the use of other drugs first ( 1 ) Ziprasidone capsules are indicated for the: treatment of schizophrenia in adults. ( 1 ) acute treatment of adults as monotherapy of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. ( 1 ) maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder as an adjunct to lithium or valproate in adults. ( 1 )

Dependence

9.3 Dependence Ziprasidone has not been systematically studied, in animals or humans, for its potential for abuse, tolerance, or physical dependence. While the clinical trials did not reveal any tendency for drug-seeking behavior, these observations were not systematic and it is not possible to predict on the basis of this limited experience the extent to which ziprasidone will be misused, diverted, and/or abused once marketed. Consequently, patients should be evaluated carefully for a history of drug abuse, and such patients should be observed closely for signs of ziprasidone misuse or abuse (e.g., development of tolerance, increases in dose, drug-seeking behavior).

Drug Abuse And Dependence

9 DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE 9.3 Dependence Ziprasidone has not been systematically studied, in animals or humans, for its potential for abuse, tolerance, or physical dependence. While the clinical trials did not reveal any tendency for drug-seeking behavior, these observations were not systematic and it is not possible to predict on the basis of this limited experience the extent to which ziprasidone will be misused, diverted, and/or abused once marketed. Consequently, patients should be evaluated carefully for a history of drug abuse, and such patients should be observed closely for signs of ziprasidone misuse or abuse (e.g., development of tolerance, increases in dose, drug-seeking behavior).

Overdosage

10 OVERDOSAGE 10.1 Human Experience In premarketing trials involving more than 5400 patients and/or normal subjects, accidental or intentional overdosage of oral ziprasidone was documented in 10 patients. All of these patients survived without sequelae. In the patient taking the largest confirmed amount, 3,240 mg, the only symptoms reported were minimal sedation, slurring of speech, and transitory hypertension (200/95). Adverse reactions reported with ziprasidone overdose included extrapyramidal symptoms, somnolence, tremor, and anxiety. [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)] 10.2 Management of Overdosage In case of acute overdosage, establish and maintain an airway and ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation. Intravenous access should be established, and gastric lavage (after intubation, if patient is unconscious) and administration of activated charcoal together with a laxative should be considered. The possibility of obtundation, seizure, or dystonic reaction of the head and neck following overdose may create a risk of aspiration with induced emesis. Cardiovascular monitoring should commence immediately and should include continuous electrocardiographic monitoring to detect possible arrhythmias. If antiarrhythmic therapy is administered, disopyramide, procainamide, and quinidine carry a theoretical hazard of additive QT-prolonging effects that might be additive to those of ziprasidone. Hypotension and circulatory collapse should be treated with appropriate measures such as intravenous fluids. If sympathomimetic agents are used for vascular support, epinephrine and dopamine should not be used, since beta stimulation combined with α 1 antagonism associated with ziprasidone may worsen hypotension. Similarly, it is reasonable to expect that the alpha-adrenergic-blocking properties of bretylium might be additive to those of ziprasidone, resulting in problematic hypotension. In cases of severe extrapyramidal symptoms, anticholinergic medication should be administered. There is no specific antidote to ziprasidone, and it is not dialyzable. The possibility of multiple drug involvement should be considered. Close medical supervision and monitoring should continue until the patient recovers.

Adverse Reactions Table

Table 11: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reaction Incidence In Short-Term Oral Placebo-Controlled Trials – Schizophrenia
Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction
Body System/Adverse Reaction Ziprasidone (N=702) Placebo (N=273)
* Extrapyramidal Symptoms includes the following adverse reaction terms: extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, dystonia, dyskinesia, hypokinesia, tremor, paralysis and twitching. None of these adverse reactions occurred individually at an incidence greater than 5% in schizophrenia trials. ** Dizziness includes the adverse reaction terms dizziness and lightheadedness.
Body as a Whole
Asthenia 5 3
Accidental Injury 4 2
Chest Pain 3 2
Cardiovascular
Tachycardia 2 1
Digestive
Nausea 10 7
Constipation 9 8
Dyspepsia 8 7
Diarrhea 5 4
Dry Mouth 4 2
Anorexia 2 1
Nervous
Extrapyramidal Symptoms* 14 8
Somnolence 14 7
Akathisia 8 7
Dizziness** 8 6
Respiratory
Respiratory Tract Infection 8 3
Rhinitis 4 2
Cough Increased 3 1
Skin and Appendages
Rash 4 3
Fungal Dermatitis 2 1
Special Senses
Abnormal Vision 3 2

Drug Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Drug-drug interactions can be pharmacodynamic (combined pharmacologic effects) or pharmacokinetic (alteration of plasma levels). The risks of using ziprasidone in combination with other drugs have been evaluated as described below. All interactions studies have been conducted with oral ziprasidone. Based upon the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of ziprasidone, possible interactions could be anticipated: Ziprasidone should not be used in combination with other drugs that have demonstrated QT prolongation. ( 4.1 , 7.3 ) The absorption of ziprasidone is increased up to two-fold in the presence of food. (7.10) The full prescribing information contains additional drug interactions. ( 7 ) 7.1 Metabolic Pathway Approximately two-thirds of ziprasidone is metabolized via a combination of chemical reduction by glutathione and enzymatic reduction by aldehyde oxidase. There are no known clinically relevant inhibitors or inducers of aldehyde oxidase. Less than one-third of ziprasidone metabolic clearance is mediated by cytochrome P450 catalyzed oxidation. 7.2 In Vitro Studies An in vitro enzyme inhibition study utilizing human liver microsomes showed that ziprasidone had little inhibitory effect on CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, and thus would not likely interfere with the metabolism of drugs primarily metabolized by these enzymes. There is little potential for drug interactions with ziprasidone due to displacement [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] . 7.3 Pharmacodynamic Interactions Ziprasidone should not be used with any drug that prolongs the QT interval [see Contraindications (4.1) ] . Given the primary CNS effects of ziprasidone, caution should be used when it is taken in combination with other centrally acting drugs. Because of its potential for inducing hypotension, ziprasidone may enhance the effects of certain antihypertensive agents. Ziprasidone may antagonize the effects of levodopa and dopamine agonists. 7.4 Pharmacokinetic Interactions Carbamazepine Carbamazepine is an inducer of CYP3A4; administration of 200 mg twice daily for 21 days resulted in a decrease of approximately 35% in the AUC of ziprasidone. This effect may be greater when higher doses of carbamazepine are administered. Ketoconazole Ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of CYP3A4, at a dose of 400 mg QD for 5 days, increased the AUC and C max of ziprasidone by about 35 to 40%. Other inhibitors of CYP3A4 would be expected to have similar effects. Cimetidine Cimetidine at a dose of 800 mg QD for 2 days did not affect ziprasidone pharmacokinetics. Antacid The co-administration of 30 mL of Maalox ® with ziprasidone did not affect the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. 7.5 Lithium Ziprasidone at a dose of 40 mg twice daily administered concomitantly with lithium at a dose of 450 mg twice daily for 7 days did not affect the steady-state level or renal clearance of lithium. Ziprasidone dosed adjunctively to lithium in a maintenance trial of bipolar patients did not affect mean therapeutic lithium levels. 7.6 Oral Contraceptives In vivo studies have revealed no effect of ziprasidone on the pharmacokinetics of estrogen or progesterone components. Ziprasidone at a dose of 20 mg twice daily did not affect the pharmacokinetics of concomitantly administered oral contraceptives, ethinyl estradiol (0.03 mg) and levonorgestrel (0.15 mg). 7.7 Dextromethorphan Consistent with in vitro results, a study in normal healthy volunteers showed that ziprasidone did not alter the metabolism of dextromethorphan, a CYP2D6 model substrate, to its major metabolite, dextrorphan. There was no statistically significant change in the urinary dextromethorphan/dextrorphan ratio. 7.8 Valproate A pharmacokinetic interaction of ziprasidone with valproate is unlikely due to the lack of common metabolic pathways for the two drugs. Ziprasidone dosed adjunctively to valproate in a maintenance trial of bipolar patients did not affect mean therapeutic valproate levels. 7.9 Other Concomitant Drug Therapy Population pharmacokinetic analysis of schizophrenic patients enrolled in controlled clinical trials has not revealed evidence of any clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with benztropine, propranolol, or lorazepam. 7.10 Food Interaction The absolute bioavailability of a 20 mg dose under fed conditions is approximately 60%. The absorption of ziprasidone is increased up to two-fold in the presence of food [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] .

Clinical Pharmacology

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 12.1 Mechanism of Action The mechanism of action of ziprasidone in the treatment of the listed indications could be mediated through a combination of dopamine type 2 (D 2 ) and serotonin type 2 (5HT 2 ) antagonism. 12.2 Pharmacodynamics Ziprasidone binds with relatively high affinity to the dopamine D 2 and D 3 , serotonin 5HT 2A , 5HT 2C , 5HT 1A , 5HT 1D , and α 1 -adrenergic receptors (K i s of 4.8, 7.2, 0.4, 1.3, 3.4, 2, and 10 nM, respectively), and with moderate affinity to the histamine H 1 receptor (K i =47 nM). Ziprasidone is an antagonist at the D 2 , 5HT 2A , and 5HT 1D receptors, and an agonist at the 5HT 1A receptor. Ziprasidone inhibited synaptic reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. No appreciable affinity was exhibited for other receptor/binding sites tested, including the cholinergic muscarinic receptor (IC 50 >1 μM). 12.3 Pharmacokinetics Oral Pharmacokinetics Ziprasidone’s activity is primarily due to the parent drug. The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone are dose-proportional within the proposed clinical dose range, and ziprasidone accumulation is predictable with multiple dosing. Elimination of ziprasidone is mainly via hepatic metabolism with a mean terminal half-life of about 7 hours within the proposed clinical dose range. Steady-state concentrations are achieved within one to three days of dosing. The mean apparent systemic clearance is 7.5 mL/min/kg. Ziprasidone is unlikely to interfere with the metabolism of drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absorption: Ziprasidone is well absorbed after oral administration, reaching peak plasma concentrations in 6 to 8 hours. The absolute bioavailability of a 20 mg dose under fed conditions is approximately 60%. The absorption of ziprasidone is increased up to two-fold in the presence of food. Distribution: Ziprasidone has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 1.5 L/kg. It is greater than 99% bound to plasma proteins, binding primarily to albumin and α 1 -acid glycoprotein. The in vitro plasma protein binding of ziprasidone was not altered by warfarin or propranolol, two highly protein-bound drugs, nor did ziprasidone alter the binding of these drugs in human plasma. Thus, the potential for drug interactions with ziprasidone due to displacement is minimal. Metabolism and Elimination : Ziprasidone is extensively metabolized after oral administration with only a small amount excreted in the urine (<1%) or feces (<4%) as unchanged drug. Ziprasidone is primarily cleared via three metabolic routes to yield four major circulating metabolites, benzisothiazole (BITP) sulphoxide, BITP­-sulphone, ziprasidone sulphoxide, and S-methyldihydroziprasidone. Approximately 20% of the dose is excreted in the urine, with approximately 66% being eliminated in the feces. Unchanged ziprasidone represents about 44% of total drug-related material in serum. In vitro studies using human liver subcellular fractions indicate that S­-methyldihydroziprasidone is generated in two steps. These studies indicate that the reduction reaction is mediated primarily by chemical reduction by glutathione as well as by enzymatic reduction by aldehyde oxidase and the subsequent methylation is mediated by thiol methyltransferase. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes indicate that CYP3A4 is the major CYP contributing to the oxidative metabolism of ziprasidone. CYP1A2 may contribute to a much lesser extent. Based on in vivo abundance of excretory metabolites, less than one-third of ziprasidone metabolic clearance is mediated by cytochrome P450 catalyzed oxidation and approximately two-thirds via reduction. There are no known clinically relevant inhibitors or inducers of aldehyde oxidase.

Mechanism Of Action

12.1 Mechanism of Action The mechanism of action of ziprasidone in the treatment of the listed indications could be mediated through a combination of dopamine type 2 (D 2 ) and serotonin type 2 (5HT 2 ) antagonism.

Pharmacodynamics

12.2 Pharmacodynamics Ziprasidone binds with relatively high affinity to the dopamine D 2 and D 3 , serotonin 5HT 2A , 5HT 2C , 5HT 1A , 5HT 1D , and α 1 -adrenergic receptors (K i s of 4.8, 7.2, 0.4, 1.3, 3.4, 2, and 10 nM, respectively), and with moderate affinity to the histamine H 1 receptor (K i =47 nM). Ziprasidone is an antagonist at the D 2 , 5HT 2A , and 5HT 1D receptors, and an agonist at the 5HT 1A receptor. Ziprasidone inhibited synaptic reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. No appreciable affinity was exhibited for other receptor/binding sites tested, including the cholinergic muscarinic receptor (IC 50 >1 μM).

Pharmacokinetics

12.3 Pharmacokinetics Oral Pharmacokinetics Ziprasidone’s activity is primarily due to the parent drug. The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone are dose-proportional within the proposed clinical dose range, and ziprasidone accumulation is predictable with multiple dosing. Elimination of ziprasidone is mainly via hepatic metabolism with a mean terminal half-life of about 7 hours within the proposed clinical dose range. Steady-state concentrations are achieved within one to three days of dosing. The mean apparent systemic clearance is 7.5 mL/min/kg. Ziprasidone is unlikely to interfere with the metabolism of drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absorption: Ziprasidone is well absorbed after oral administration, reaching peak plasma concentrations in 6 to 8 hours. The absolute bioavailability of a 20 mg dose under fed conditions is approximately 60%. The absorption of ziprasidone is increased up to two-fold in the presence of food. Distribution: Ziprasidone has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 1.5 L/kg. It is greater than 99% bound to plasma proteins, binding primarily to albumin and α 1 -acid glycoprotein. The in vitro plasma protein binding of ziprasidone was not altered by warfarin or propranolol, two highly protein-bound drugs, nor did ziprasidone alter the binding of these drugs in human plasma. Thus, the potential for drug interactions with ziprasidone due to displacement is minimal. Metabolism and Elimination : Ziprasidone is extensively metabolized after oral administration with only a small amount excreted in the urine (<1%) or feces (<4%) as unchanged drug. Ziprasidone is primarily cleared via three metabolic routes to yield four major circulating metabolites, benzisothiazole (BITP) sulphoxide, BITP­-sulphone, ziprasidone sulphoxide, and S-methyldihydroziprasidone. Approximately 20% of the dose is excreted in the urine, with approximately 66% being eliminated in the feces. Unchanged ziprasidone represents about 44% of total drug-related material in serum. In vitro studies using human liver subcellular fractions indicate that S­-methyldihydroziprasidone is generated in two steps. These studies indicate that the reduction reaction is mediated primarily by chemical reduction by glutathione as well as by enzymatic reduction by aldehyde oxidase and the subsequent methylation is mediated by thiol methyltransferase. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes indicate that CYP3A4 is the major CYP contributing to the oxidative metabolism of ziprasidone. CYP1A2 may contribute to a much lesser extent. Based on in vivo abundance of excretory metabolites, less than one-third of ziprasidone metabolic clearance is mediated by cytochrome P450 catalyzed oxidation and approximately two-thirds via reduction. There are no known clinically relevant inhibitors or inducers of aldehyde oxidase.

Effective Time

20230906

Version

5

Dosage Forms And Strengths

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Ziprasidone Capsules USP, 20 mg are blue opaque cap/off-white opaque body, size “5” hard gelatin capsule shells, filled with creamy to pale pinkish granular powder, imprinted with “F” on cap and “26” on body with black ink. Ziprasidone Capsules USP, 40 mg are blue opaque cap/blue opaque body, size “3” hard gelatin capsule shells, filled with creamy to pale pinkish granular powder, imprinted with “F” on cap and “38” on body with black ink. Ziprasidone Capsules USP, 60 mg are off-white opaque cap/off-white opaque body, size “2” hard gelatin capsule shells, filled with creamy to pale pinkish granular powder, imprinted with “F” on cap and “39” on body with black ink. Ziprasidone Capsules USP, 80 mg are blue opaque cap/off-white opaque body, size “1” hard gelatin capsule shells, filled with creamy to pale pinkish granular powder, imprinted with “X” on cap and “66” on body with black ink. Capsules: 20 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, and 80 mg (3)

Spl Product Data Elements

Ziprasidone Hydrochloride Ziprasidone Hydrochloride ETHYLCELLULOSE (10 MPA.S) LACTOSE MONOHYDRATE MAGNESIUM STEARATE STARCH, CORN GELATIN, UNSPECIFIED SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE TITANIUM DIOXIDE FERROSOFERRIC OXIDE POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE SHELLAC AMMONIA ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE Off-white Opaque F;39

Carcinogenesis And Mutagenesis And Impairment Of Fertility

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility Carcinogenesis Lifetime carcinogenicity studies were conducted with ziprasidone in Long Evans rats and CD-1 mice. Ziprasidone was administered for 24 months in the diet at doses of 2, 6, or 12 mg/kg/day to rats, and 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day to mice (0.1 to 0.6 and 1 to 5 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area, respectively). In the rat study, there was no evidence of an increased incidence of tumors compared to controls. In male mice, there was no increase in incidence of tumors relative to controls. In female mice, there were dose-related increases in the incidences of pituitary gland adenoma and carcinoma, and mammary gland adenocarcinoma at all doses tested (50 to 200 mg/kg/day or 1 to 5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Proliferative changes in the pituitary and mammary glands of rodents have been observed following chronic administration of other antipsychotic agents and are considered to be prolactin-mediated. Increases in serum prolactin were observed in a 1-month dietary study in female, but not male, mice at 100 and 200 mg/kg/day (or 2.5 and 5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Ziprasidone had no effect on serum prolactin in rats in a 5-week dietary study at the doses that were used in the carcinogenicity study. The relevance for human risk of the findings of prolactin-mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unknown [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14) ]. Mutagenesis Ziprasidone was tested in the Ames bacterial mutation assay, the in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation mouse lymphoma assay, the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, and the in vivo chromosomal aberration assay in mouse bone marrow. There was a reproducible mutagenic response in the Ames assay in one strain of S. typhimurium in the absence of metabolic activation. Positive results were obtained in both the in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation assay and the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes. Impairment of Fertility Ziprasidone was shown to increase time to copulation in Sprague-Dawley rats in two fertility and early embryonic development studies at doses of 10 to 160 mg/kg/day (0.5 to 8 times the MRHD of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Fertility rate was reduced at 160 mg/kg/day (8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was no effect on fertility at 40 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). The effect on fertility appeared to be in the female since fertility was not impaired when males given 160 mg/kg/day (8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) were mated with untreated females.

Nonclinical Toxicology

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY 13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility Carcinogenesis Lifetime carcinogenicity studies were conducted with ziprasidone in Long Evans rats and CD-1 mice. Ziprasidone was administered for 24 months in the diet at doses of 2, 6, or 12 mg/kg/day to rats, and 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day to mice (0.1 to 0.6 and 1 to 5 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area, respectively). In the rat study, there was no evidence of an increased incidence of tumors compared to controls. In male mice, there was no increase in incidence of tumors relative to controls. In female mice, there were dose-related increases in the incidences of pituitary gland adenoma and carcinoma, and mammary gland adenocarcinoma at all doses tested (50 to 200 mg/kg/day or 1 to 5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Proliferative changes in the pituitary and mammary glands of rodents have been observed following chronic administration of other antipsychotic agents and are considered to be prolactin-mediated. Increases in serum prolactin were observed in a 1-month dietary study in female, but not male, mice at 100 and 200 mg/kg/day (or 2.5 and 5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Ziprasidone had no effect on serum prolactin in rats in a 5-week dietary study at the doses that were used in the carcinogenicity study. The relevance for human risk of the findings of prolactin-mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unknown [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14) ]. Mutagenesis Ziprasidone was tested in the Ames bacterial mutation assay, the in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation mouse lymphoma assay, the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, and the in vivo chromosomal aberration assay in mouse bone marrow. There was a reproducible mutagenic response in the Ames assay in one strain of S. typhimurium in the absence of metabolic activation. Positive results were obtained in both the in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation assay and the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes. Impairment of Fertility Ziprasidone was shown to increase time to copulation in Sprague-Dawley rats in two fertility and early embryonic development studies at doses of 10 to 160 mg/kg/day (0.5 to 8 times the MRHD of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area). Fertility rate was reduced at 160 mg/kg/day (8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was no effect on fertility at 40 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). The effect on fertility appeared to be in the female since fertility was not impaired when males given 160 mg/kg/day (8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) were mated with untreated females.

Application Number

ANDA204117

Brand Name

Ziprasidone Hydrochloride

Generic Name

Ziprasidone Hydrochloride

Product Ndc

70518-2757

Product Type

HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG

Route

ORAL

Package Label Principal Display Panel

DRUG: Ziprasidone Hydrochloride GENERIC: Ziprasidone Hydrochloride DOSAGE: CAPSULE ADMINSTRATION: ORAL NDC: 70518-2757-0 COLOR: white SHAPE: CAPSULE SCORE: No score SIZE: 17 mm IMPRINT: F;39 PACKAGING: 30 in 1 BLISTER PACK ACTIVE INGREDIENT(S): ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE 60mg in 1 INACTIVE INGREDIENT(S): ETHYLCELLULOSE (10 MPA.S) LACTOSE MONOHYDRATE MAGNESIUM STEARATE STARCH, CORN GELATIN, UNSPECIFIED SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE TITANIUM DIOXIDE FERROSOFERRIC OXIDE POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE SHELLAC AMMONIA Remedy_Label

Information For Patients

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling ( Patient Information ). Administration Information for Capsules Advise patients to take ziprasidone capsules whole. Do not open, crush, or chew the capsules. Instruct patients to take ziprasidone capsules with food for optimal absorption. The absorption of ziprasidone is increased up to two-fold in the presence of food [see Dosage and Administration (2.1) , Drug Interactions (7.10) , and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] . QTc Prolongation Advise patients to inform their health care providers of the following: History of QT prolongation; recent acute myocardial infarction; uncompensated heart failure; prescription of other drugs that have demonstrated QT prolongation; risk for significant electrolyte abnormalities; and history of cardiac arrhythmia [see Contraindications (4.1) and Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] . Instruct patients to report the onset of any conditions that put them at risk for significant electrolyte disturbances, hypokalemia in particular, including but not limited to the initiation of diuretic therapy or prolonged diarrhea. In addition, instruct patients to report symptoms such as dizziness, palpitations, or syncope to the prescriber [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] . Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions Instruct patients to report to their health care provider at the earliest onset any signs or symptoms that may be associated with Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) or with severe cutaneous adverse reactions, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) ] . Pregnancy Advise pregnant women to notify their healthcare provider if they become pregnant or intend to become pregnant during treatment with ziprasidone. Advise patients that ziprasidone may cause extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms (agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress, and feeding disorder) in a neonate. Advise patients that there is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to ziprasidone during pregnancy [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1) ]. Lactation Advise breastfeeding women using ziprasidone to monitor infants for excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors, and abnormal muscle movements) and to seek medical care if they notice these signs [see Use in Specific Populations (8.2) ]. Infertility Advise females of reproductive potential that ziprasidone may impair fertility due to an increase in serum prolactin levels. The effects on fertility are reversible [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15) and Use in Specific Populations (8.3) ]. Repackaged By / Distributed By: RemedyRepack Inc. 625 Kolter Drive, Indiana, PA 15701 (724) 465-8762

Clinical Studies

14 CLINICAL STUDIES 14.1 Schizophrenia The efficacy of oral ziprasidone in the treatment of schizophrenia was evaluated in 5 placebo-controlled studies, 4 short-term (4- and 6-week) trials and one maintenance trial. All trials were in adult inpatients, most of whom met DSM III-R criteria for schizophrenia. Each study included 2 to 3 fixed doses of ziprasidone as well as placebo. Four of the 5 trials were able to distinguish ziprasidone from placebo; one short-term study did not. Although a single fixed-dose haloperidol arm was included as a comparative treatment in one of the three short-term trials, this single study was inadequate to provide a reliable and valid comparison of ziprasidone and haloperidol. Several instruments were used for assessing psychiatric signs and symptoms in these studies. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) are both multi-item inventories of general psychopathology usually used to evaluate the effects of drug treatment in schizophrenia. The BPRS psychosis cluster (conceptual disorganization, hallucinatory behavior, suspiciousness, and unusual thought content) is considered a particularly useful subset for assessing actively psychotic schizophrenic patients. A second widely used assessment, the Clinical Global Impression (CGI), reflects the impression of a skilled observer, fully familiar with the manifestations of schizophrenia, about the overall clinical state of the patient. In addition, the Scale for Assessing Negative Symptoms (SANS) was employed for assessing negative symptoms in one trial. The results of the oral ziprasidone trials in schizophrenia follow: In a 4-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=139) comparing 2 fixed doses of ziprasidone (20 and 60 mg twice daily) with placebo, only the 60 mg dose was superior to placebo on the BPRS total score and the CGI severity score. This higher dose group was not superior to placebo on the BPRS psychosis cluster or on the SANS. In a 6-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=302) comparing 2 fixed doses of ziprasidone (40 and 80 mg twice daily) with placebo, both dose groups were superior to placebo on the BPRS total score, the BPRS psychosis cluster, the CGI severity score and the PANSS total and negative subscale scores. Although 80 mg twice daily had a numerically greater effect than 40 mg twice daily, the difference was not statistically significant. In a 6-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=419) comparing 3 fixed doses of ziprasidone (20, 60, and 100 mg twice daily) with placebo, all three dose groups were superior to placebo on the PANSS total score, the BPRS total score, the BPRS psychosis cluster, and the CGI severity score. Only the 100 mg twice daily dose group was superior to placebo on the PANSS negative subscale score. There was no clear evidence for a dose-response relationship within the 20 mg twice daily to 100 mg twice daily dose range. In a 4-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=200) comparing 3 fixed doses of ziprasidone (5, 20, and 40 mg twice daily), none of the dose groups was statistically superior to placebo on any outcome of interest. A study was conducted in stable chronic or subchronic (CGI-S ≤5 at baseline) schizophrenic inpatients (n=294) who had been hospitalized for not less than two months. After a 3-day single-blind placebo run-in, subjects were randomized to one of 3 fixed doses of ziprasidone (20 mg, 40 mg, or 80 mg twice daily) or placebo and observed for relapse. Patients were observed for "impending psychotic relapse," defined as CGI-improvement score of ≥6 (much worse or very much worse) and/or scores ≥6 (moderately severe) on the hostility or uncooperativeness items of the PANSS on two consecutive days. Ziprasidone was significantly superior to placebo in time to relapse, with no significant difference between the different dose groups. There were insufficient data to examine population subsets based on age and race. Examination of population subsets based on gender did not reveal any differential responsiveness. 14.2 Bipolar I Disorder (Acute Mixed or Manic Episodes and Maintenance Treatment as an Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate) Acute Manic and Mixed Episodes Associated With Bipolar I Disorder The efficacy of ziprasidone was established in 2 placebo-controlled, double-blind, 3-week monotherapy studies in patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed episode with or without psychotic features. Primary rating instruments used for assessing manic symptoms in these trials were: (1) the Mania Rating Scale (MRS), which is derived from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Change Version (SADS-CB) with items grouped as the Manic Syndrome subscale (elevated mood, less need for sleep, excessive energy, excessive activity, grandiosity), the Behavior and Ideation subscale (irritability, motor hyperactivity, accelerated speech, racing thoughts, poor judgment) and impaired insight; and (2) the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness Scale (CGI-S), which was used to assess the clinical significance of treatment response. The results of the oral ziprasidone trials in adult bipolar I disorder, manic/mixed episode follow: in a 3-week placebo-controlled trial (n=210), the dose of ziprasidone was 40 mg twice daily on Day 1 and 80 mg twice daily on Day 2. Titration within the range of 40-80 mg twice daily (in 20 mg twice daily increments) was permitted for the duration of the study. Ziprasidone was significantly more effective than placebo in reduction of the MRS total score and the CGI-S score. The mean daily dose of ziprasidone in this study was 132 mg. In a second 3-week placebo-controlled trial (n=205), the dose of ziprasidone was 40 mg twice daily on Day 1. Titration within the range of 40-80 mg twice daily (in 20 mg twice daily increments) was permitted for the duration of study (beginning on Day 2). Ziprasidone was significantly more effective than placebo in reduction of the MRS total score and the CGI-S score. The mean daily dose of ziprasidone in this study was 112 mg. Maintenance Therapy The efficacy of ziprasidone as adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder was established in a placebo-controlled trial in patients who met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder. The trial included patients whose most recent episode was manic or mixed, with or without psychotic features. In the open-label phase, patients were required to be stabilized on ziprasidone plus lithium or valproic acid for at least 8 weeks in order to be randomized. In the double-blind randomized phase, patients continued treatment with lithium or valproic acid and were randomized to receive either ziprasidone (administered twice daily totaling 80 mg to 160 mg per day) or placebo. Generally, in the maintenance phase, patients continued on the same dose on which they were stabilized during the stabilization phase. The primary endpoint in this study was time to recurrence of a mood episode (manic, mixed or depressed episode) requiring intervention, which was defined as any of the following: discontinuation due to a mood episode, clinical intervention for a mood episode (e.g., initiation of medication or hospitalization), or Mania Rating Scale score ≥18 or a MADRS score ≥18 (on 2 consecutive assessments no more than 10 days apart). A total of 584 subjects were treated in the open-label stabilization period. In the double-blind randomization period, 127 subjects were treated with ziprasidone, and 112 subjects were treated with placebo. Ziprasidone was superior to placebo in increasing the time to recurrence of a mood episode. The types of relapse events observed included depressive, manic, and mixed episodes. Depressive, manic, and mixed episodes accounted for 53%, 34%, and 13%, respectively, of the total number of relapse events in the study.

Geriatric Use

8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total number of subjects in clinical studies of ziprasidone, 2.4 percent were 65 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Nevertheless, the presence of multiple factors that might increase the pharmacodynamic response to ziprasidone, or cause poorer tolerance or orthostasis, should lead to consideration of a lower starting dose, slower titration, and careful monitoring during the initial dosing period for some elderly patients.

Labor And Delivery

8.2 Lactation Risk Summary Limited data from a published case report indicate the presence of ziprasidone in human milk. Although there are no reports of adverse effects on a breastfed infant exposed to ziprasidone via breast milk, there are reports of excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements) in infants exposed to other atypical antipsychotics through breast milk (see Clinical Considerations) . There is no information on the effects of ziprasidone on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for ziprasidone and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from ziprasidone or from the mother’s underlying condition. Clinical Considerations Infants exposed to ziprasidone should be monitored for excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements).

Nursing Mothers

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Infertility Females Based on the pharmacologic action of ziprasidone (D2 antagonism), treatment with ziprasidone may result in an increase in serum prolactin levels, which may lead to a reversible reduction in fertility in females of reproductive potential [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1) ].

Pediatric Use

8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of ziprasidone have not been established in pediatric patients.

Pregnancy

8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to atypical antipsychotics, including ziprasidone, during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by contacting the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or online at http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/. Risk Summary Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including ziprasidone, during the third trimester are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms following delivery (see Clinical Considerations) . Overall available data from published epidemiologic studies of pregnant women exposed to ziprasidone have not established a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes (see Data). There are risks to the mother associated with untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder and with exposure to antipsychotics, including ziprasidone, during pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations) . In animal studies, ziprasidone administration to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis caused developmental toxicity at doses similar to recommended human doses, and was teratogenic in rabbits at 3 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD). Rats exposed to ziprasidone during gestation and lactation exhibited increased perinatal pup mortality and delayed neurobehavioral and functional development of offspring at doses less than or similar to human therapeutic doses. (see Data) . The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk There is risk to the mother from untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder, including increased risk of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are associated with increased adverse perinatal outcomes, including preterm birth. It is not known if this is a direct result of the illness or other comorbid factors. Fetal/neonatal adverse reactions Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress, and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including ziprasidone, during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms and manage symptoms appropriately. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization. Data Human Data Published data from observational studies, birth registries, and case reports on the use of atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy do not report a clear association with antipsychotics and major birth defects. A retrospective cohort study from a Medicaid database of 9258 women exposed to antipsychotics during pregnancy did not indicate an overall increased risk for major birth defects. Animal Data When ziprasidone was administered to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis, an increased incidence of fetal structural abnormalities (ventricular septal defects and other cardiovascular malformations, and kidney alterations) was observed at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day (3 times the MRHD of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was no evidence to suggest that these developmental effects were secondary to maternal toxicity. The developmental no effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the MRHD based on a mg/m 2 body surface area). In rats, embryofetal toxicity (decreased fetal weights, delayed skeletal ossification) was observed following administration of 10 to 160 mg/kg/day (0.5 to 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) during organogenesis or throughout gestation, but there was no evidence of teratogenicity. Doses of 40 and 160 mg/kg/day (2 and 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) were associated with maternal toxicity. The developmental no-effect dose is 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was an increase in the number of pups born dead and a decrease in postnatal survival through the first 4 days of lactation among the offspring of female rats treated during gestation and lactation with doses of 10 mg/kg/day (0.5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) or greater. Offspring developmental delays (decreased pup weights) and neurobehavioral functional impairment (eye opening air righting) were observed at doses of 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) or greater. A no-effect level was not established for these effects.

Use In Specific Populations

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy : May cause extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms in neonates with third trimester exposure. ( 8.1 ) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to atypical antipsychotics, including ziprasidone, during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by contacting the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or online at http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/. Risk Summary Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including ziprasidone, during the third trimester are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms following delivery (see Clinical Considerations) . Overall available data from published epidemiologic studies of pregnant women exposed to ziprasidone have not established a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes (see Data). There are risks to the mother associated with untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder and with exposure to antipsychotics, including ziprasidone, during pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations) . In animal studies, ziprasidone administration to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis caused developmental toxicity at doses similar to recommended human doses, and was teratogenic in rabbits at 3 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD). Rats exposed to ziprasidone during gestation and lactation exhibited increased perinatal pup mortality and delayed neurobehavioral and functional development of offspring at doses less than or similar to human therapeutic doses. (see Data) . The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk There is risk to the mother from untreated schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder, including increased risk of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are associated with increased adverse perinatal outcomes, including preterm birth. It is not known if this is a direct result of the illness or other comorbid factors. Fetal/neonatal adverse reactions Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress, and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs, including ziprasidone, during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms and manage symptoms appropriately. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization. Data Human Data Published data from observational studies, birth registries, and case reports on the use of atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy do not report a clear association with antipsychotics and major birth defects. A retrospective cohort study from a Medicaid database of 9258 women exposed to antipsychotics during pregnancy did not indicate an overall increased risk for major birth defects. Animal Data When ziprasidone was administered to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis, an increased incidence of fetal structural abnormalities (ventricular septal defects and other cardiovascular malformations, and kidney alterations) was observed at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day (3 times the MRHD of 200 mg/day based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was no evidence to suggest that these developmental effects were secondary to maternal toxicity. The developmental no effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the MRHD based on a mg/m 2 body surface area). In rats, embryofetal toxicity (decreased fetal weights, delayed skeletal ossification) was observed following administration of 10 to 160 mg/kg/day (0.5 to 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) during organogenesis or throughout gestation, but there was no evidence of teratogenicity. Doses of 40 and 160 mg/kg/day (2 and 8 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) were associated with maternal toxicity. The developmental no-effect dose is 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area). There was an increase in the number of pups born dead and a decrease in postnatal survival through the first 4 days of lactation among the offspring of female rats treated during gestation and lactation with doses of 10 mg/kg/day (0.5 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) or greater. Offspring developmental delays (decreased pup weights) and neurobehavioral functional impairment (eye opening air righting) were observed at doses of 5 mg/kg/day (0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m 2 body surface area) or greater. A no-effect level was not established for these effects. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary Limited data from a published case report indicate the presence of ziprasidone in human milk. Although there are no reports of adverse effects on a breastfed infant exposed to ziprasidone via breast milk, there are reports of excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements) in infants exposed to other atypical antipsychotics through breast milk (see Clinical Considerations) . There is no information on the effects of ziprasidone on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for ziprasidone and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from ziprasidone or from the mother’s underlying condition. Clinical Considerations Infants exposed to ziprasidone should be monitored for excess sedation, irritability, poor feeding, and extrapyramidal symptoms (tremors and abnormal muscle movements). 8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Infertility Females Based on the pharmacologic action of ziprasidone (D2 antagonism), treatment with ziprasidone may result in an increase in serum prolactin levels, which may lead to a reversible reduction in fertility in females of reproductive potential [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1) ]. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of ziprasidone have not been established in pediatric patients. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total number of subjects in clinical studies of ziprasidone, 2.4 percent were 65 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Nevertheless, the presence of multiple factors that might increase the pharmacodynamic response to ziprasidone, or cause poorer tolerance or orthostasis, should lead to consideration of a lower starting dose, slower titration, and careful monitoring during the initial dosing period for some elderly patients. 8.6 Renal Impairment Because ziprasidone is highly metabolized, with less than 1% of the drug excreted unchanged, renal impairment alone is unlikely to have a major impact on the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. The pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone following 8 days of 20 mg twice daily dosing were similar among subjects with varying degrees of renal impairment (n=27), and subjects with normal renal function, indicating that dosage adjustment based upon the degree of renal impairment is not required. Ziprasidone is not removed by hemodialysis. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment As ziprasidone is cleared substantially by the liver, the presence of hepatic impairment would be expected to increase the AUC of ziprasidone; a multiple-dose study at 20 mg twice daily for 5 days in subjects (n=13) with clinically significant (Childs-Pugh Class A and B) cirrhosis revealed an increase in AUC 0-12 of 13% and 34% in Childs-Pugh Class A and B, respectively, compared to a matched control group (n=14). A half-life of 7.1 hours was observed in subjects with cirrhosis compared to 4.8 hours in the control group. 8.8 Age and Gender Effects In a multiple-dose (8 days of treatment) study involving 32 subjects, there was no difference in the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone between men and women or between elderly (>65 years) and young (18 to 45 years) subjects. Additionally, population pharmacokinetic evaluation of patients in controlled trials has revealed no evidence of clinically significant age or gender-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. Dosage modifications for age or gender are, therefore, not recommended. 8.9 Smoking Based on in vitro studies utilizing human liver enzymes, ziprasidone is not a substrate for CYP1A2; smoking should therefore not have an effect on the pharmacokinetics of ziprasidone. Consistent with these in vitro results, population pharmacokinetic evaluation has not revealed any significant pharmacokinetic differences between smokers and nonsmokers.

How Supplied

16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING Ziprasidone Capsules USP, 60 mg are off-white opaque cap/off-white opaque body, size “2” hard gelatin capsule shells, filled with creamy to pale pinkish granular powder, imprinted with “F” on cap and “39” on body with black ink. NDC: 70518-2757-00 PACKAGING: 30 in 1 BLISTER PACK Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Repackaged and Distributed By: Remedy Repack, Inc. 625 Kolter Dr. Suite #4 Indiana, PA 1-724-465-8762

Boxed Warning

WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Ziprasidone hydrochloride is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ] . WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Ziprasidone hydrochloride is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis ( 5.1 )

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