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FDA Drug information

Oxybutynin Chloride Extended Release

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Marketing start date: 27 May 2024

Summary of product characteristics


Adverse Reactions

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The most common (incidence ≥ 5%) adverse reactions were dry mouth, constipation, diarrhea, headache, somnolence, and dizziness. ( 6 ) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Rising Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at 1-866-562-4597 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, the adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. The safety and efficacy of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets (5 to 30 mg/day) was evaluated in 774 adult subjects who participated in five double-blind, controlled clinical trials. In four of the five studies, oxybutynin chloride immediate release tablets (5 to 20 mg/day in 199 subjects) was an active comparator. Adverse reactions reported by ≥ 1% of subjects are shown in Table 1. Table 1: Adverse Drug Reactions Reported by ≥ 1% of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets-treated Adult Subjects in Five Double-blind, Controlled Clinical Trials of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets. System/Organ Class Preferred Term Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 5 to 30 mg/day n = 774 % Oxybutynin Chloride IR 1 Tablets 5 to 20 mg/day n = 199 % Psychiatric Disorders Insomnia 3.0 5.5 Nervous System Disorders Headache 7.5 8.0 Somnolence 5.6 14.1 Dizziness 5.0 16.6 Dysgeusia 1.6 1.5 Eye Disorders Vision blurred 4.3 9.6 Dry eye 3.1 2.5 Respiratory , Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders Cough 1.9 3.0 Oropharyngeal pain 1.9 1.5 Dry throat 1.7 2.5 Nasal dryness 1.7 4.5 Gastrointestinal Disorders Dry mouth 34.9 72.4 Constipation 8.7 15.1 Diarrhea 7.9 6.5 Dyspepsia 4.5 6.0 Nausea 4.5 11.6 Abdominal pain 1.6 2.0 Vomiting 1.3 1.5 Flatulence 1.2 2.5 Gastro-esophageal reflux disease 1.0 0.5 Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders Dry skin 1.8 2.5 Pruritus 1.3 1.5 Renal and Urinary Disorders Dysuria 1.9 2.0 Urinary hesitation 1.9 8.5 Urinary retention 1.2 3.0 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 2.6 3.0 Investigations Residual urine volume 2 2.3 3.5 1 IR=immediate release 2 The bundled term residual urine volume consists of the preferred terms residual urine volume and residual urine volume increased. The discontinuation rate due to adverse reactions was 4.4% with oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets compared to 0% with oxybutynin chloride immediate release tablets. The most frequent adverse reaction causing discontinuation of study medication was dry mouth (0.7%). The following adverse reactions were reported by < 1% of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets-treated patients and at a higher incidence than placebo in clinical trials: Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders: anorexia, fluid retention; Vascular disorders: hot flush; Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: dysphonia; Gastrointestinal Disorders: dysphagia, frequent bowel movements; General disorders and administration site conditions: chest discomfort, thirst. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following additional adverse reactions have been reported from worldwide postmarketing experience with oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. Because postmarketing reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Infections and Infestations: Urinary tract infection; Psychiatric Disorders: psychotic disorder, agitation, confusional state, hallucinations, memory impairment, abnormal behavior; Nervous System Disorders: convulsions; Eye Disorders: glaucoma; Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: nasal congestion; Cardiac Disorders: arrhythmia, tachycardia, palpitations, QT interval prolongation; Vascular Disorders: flushing, hypertension; Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: rash; Renal and Urinary Disorders: impotence; General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: hypersensitivity reactions, including angioedema with airway obstruction, urticaria, and face edema; anaphylactic reactions requiring hospitalization for emergency treatment; Injury, poisoning and procedural complications: fall. Additional adverse events reported with some other oxybutynin chloride formulations include: cycloplegia, mydriasis, and suppression of lactation. In one reported case, concomitant use of oxybutynin with carbamazepine and dantrolene was associated with adverse events of vomiting, drowsiness, confusion, unsteadiness, slurred speech and nystagmus, suggestive of carbamazepine toxicity.

Contraindications

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated in patients with urinary retention, gastric retention and other severe decreased gastrointestinal motility conditions, uncontrolled narrow-angle glaucoma. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are also contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated hypersensitivity to the drug substance or other components of the product. There have been reports of hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema. Urinary retention ( 4 ) Gastric Retention ( 4 ) Uncontrolled narrow angle glaucoma ( 4 ) Known hypersensitivity to oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, oxybutynin or any component of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. ( 4 )

Description

11 DESCRIPTION Oxybutynin chloride USP is an antispasmodic, muscarinic antagonist. Each oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablet USP contains 5 mg, 10 mg or 15 mg of oxybutynin chloride USP, formulated as a once-a-day controlled-release tablet for oral administration. Oxybutynin chloride is administered as a racemate of R- and S-enantiomers. Chemically, oxybutynin chloride is d,l (racemic) 4-diethylamino-2-butynylphenylcyclohexylglycolate hydrochloride. The empirical formula of oxybutynin chloride is C 22 H 31 NO 3 •HCl. Its structural formula is: Oxybutynin chloride USP is a white crystalline solid with a molecular weight of 393.9. It is readily soluble in water and acids, but relatively insoluble in alkalis. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablet, USP also contains the following inert ingredients: polyethylene oxide, hypromellose, sodium chloride, butylated hydroxytoluene, ferric oxide (yellow), ferric oxide (red), ferric oxide (black), colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, cellulose acetate, polyethylene glycol, titanium dioxide, lactose monohydrate, triacetin, shellac, and propylene glycol. System Components and Performance Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets USP uses osmotic pressure to deliver oxybutynin chloride at a controlled rate over approximately 24 hours. The system, which resembles a conventional tablet in appearance, comprises an osmotically active bilayer core surrounded by a semipermeable membrane. The bilayer core is composed of a drug layer containing the drug and excipients, and a push layer containing osmotically active components. There is a precision-laser drilled orifice in the semipermeable membrane on the drug-layer side of the tablet. In an aqueous environment, such as the gastrointestinal tract, water permeates through the membrane into the tablet core, causing the drug to go into suspension and the push layer to expand. This expansion pushes the suspended drug out through the orifice. The semipermeable membrane controls the rate at which water permeates into the tablet core, which in turn controls the rate of drug delivery. The controlled rate of drug delivery into the gastrointestinal lumen is thus independent of pH or gastrointestinal motility. The function of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets depends on the existence of an osmotic gradient between the contents of the bilayer core and the fluid in the gastrointestinal tract. Since the osmotic gradient remains constant, drug delivery remains essentially constant. The biologically inert components of the tablet remain intact during gastrointestinal transit and are eliminated in the feces as an insoluble shell. Product meets USP Dissolution Test 6 structure

Dosage And Administration

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets must be swallowed whole with the aid of liquids, and must not be chewed, divided, or crushed. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets may be administered with or without food. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets must be swallowed whole with the aid of liquids, and must not be chewed, divided, or crushed. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets may be administered with or without food. ( 2 ) Adults: Start with 5 mg or 10 mg, once daily at approximately the same time every day. Dose should not exceed 30 mg per day. ( 2.1 ) Pediatric patients (6 years of age or older): Start with 5 mg, once daily at approximately the same time every day. Dose should not exceed 20 mg per day. ( 2.2 ) 2.1 Adults The recommended starting dose of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are 5 or 10 mg once daily at approximately the same time each day. Dosage may be adjusted in 5-mg increments to achieve a balance of efficacy and tolerability (up to a maximum of 30 mg/day). In general, dosage adjustment may proceed at approximately weekly intervals. 2.2 Pediatric Patients Aged 6 Years of Age and Older The recommended starting dose of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets is 5 mg once daily at approximately the same time each day. Dosage may be adjusted in 5-mg increments to achieve a balance of efficacy and tolerability (up to a maximum of 20 mg/day).

Indications And Usage

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are a muscarinic antagonist indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are also indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients aged 6 years and older with symptoms of detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are a muscarinic antagonist indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency. ( 1 ) Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are also indicated for the treatment of pediatric patients aged 6 years and older with symptoms of detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). ( 1 )

Overdosage

10 OVERDOSAGE The continuous release of oxybutynin from oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets should be considered in the treatment of overdosage. Patients should be monitored for at least 24 hours. Treatment should be symptomatic and supportive. A cathartic may be administered. Overdosage with oxybutynin chloride has been associated with anticholinergic effects including central nervous system excitation, flushing, fever, dehydration, cardiac arrhythmia, vomiting, and urinary retention. Ingestion of 100 mg oxybutynin chloride in association with alcohol has been reported in a 13-year-old boy who experienced memory loss, and a 34-year-old woman who developed stupor, followed by disorientation and agitation on awakening, dilated pupils, dry skin, cardiac arrhythmia, and retention of urine. Both patients fully recovered with symptomatic treatment.

Adverse Reactions Table

Table 1: Adverse Drug Reactions Reported by ≥ 1% of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets-treated Adult Subjects in Five Double-blind, Controlled Clinical Trials of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets.
System/Organ Class Preferred Term Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 5 to 30 mg/day n = 774 % Oxybutynin Chloride IR1 Tablets 5 to 20 mg/day n = 199 %
Psychiatric Disorders
Insomnia 3.0 5.5
Nervous System Disorders
Headache 7.5 8.0
Somnolence 5.6 14.1
Dizziness 5.0 16.6
Dysgeusia 1.6 1.5
Eye Disorders
Vision blurred 4.3 9.6
Dry eye 3.1 2.5
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders
Cough 1.9 3.0
Oropharyngeal pain 1.9 1.5
Dry throat 1.7 2.5
Nasal dryness 1.7 4.5
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Dry mouth 34.9 72.4
Constipation 8.7 15.1
Diarrhea 7.9 6.5
Dyspepsia 4.5 6.0
Nausea 4.5 11.6
Abdominal pain 1.6 2.0
Vomiting 1.3 1.5
Flatulence 1.2 2.5
Gastro-esophageal reflux disease 1.0 0.5
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders
Dry skin 1.8 2.5
Pruritus 1.3 1.5
Renal and Urinary Disorders
Dysuria 1.9 2.0
Urinary hesitation 1.9 8.5
Urinary retention 1.2 3.0
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
Fatigue 2.6 3.0
Investigations
Residual urine volume 2 2.3 3.5
1IR=immediate release 2The bundled term residual urine volume consists of the preferred terms residual urine volume and residual urine volume increased.

Drug Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS The concomitant use of oxybutynin with other anticholinergic drugs or with other agents which produce dry mouth, constipation, somnolence (drowsiness), and/or other anticholinergic-like effects may increase the frequency and/or severity of such effects. Anticholinergic agents may potentially alter the absorption of some concomitantly administered drugs due to anticholinergic effects on gastrointestinal motility. This may be of concern for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Anticholinergic agents may also antagonize the effects of prokinetic agents, such as metoclopramide. Mean oxybutynin plasma concentrations were approximately 2 fold higher when oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were administered with ketoconazole, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor. Other inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme system, such as antimycotic agents (e.g., itraconazole and miconazole) or macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin and clarithromycin), may alter oxybutynin mean pharmacokinetic parameters (i.e., C max and AUC). The clinical relevance of such potential interactions is not known. Caution should be used when such drugs are co-administered. Co-administration with other anticholinergic drugs may increase the frequency and/or severity of anticholinergic-like effects. ( 7 ) Co-administration with strong cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitors (e.g., ketoconazole) increases the systemic exposure of oxybutynin. ( 7 )

Clinical Pharmacology

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 12.1 Mechanism of Action Oxybutynin relaxes bladder smooth muscle. Oxybutynin chloride exerts a direct antispasmodic effect on smooth muscle and inhibits the muscarinic action of acetylcholine on smooth muscle. No blocking effects occur at skeletal neuromuscular junctions or autonomic ganglia (antinicotinic effects). Antimuscarinic activity resides predominantly in the R-isomer. A metabolite, desethyloxybutynin, has pharmacological activity similar to that of oxybutynin in in vitro studies. 12.2 Pharmacodynamics In patients with conditions characterized by involuntary bladder contractions, cystometric studies have demonstrated that oxybutynin increases bladder (vesical) capacity, diminishes the frequency of uninhibited contractions of the detrusor muscle, and delays the initial desire to void. 12.3 Pharmacokinetics Absorption Following the first dose of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, oxybutynin plasma concentrations rise for 4 to 6 hours; thereafter steady concentrations are maintained for up to 24 hours, minimizing fluctuations between peak and trough concentrations associated with oxybutynin. The relative bioavailabilities of R- and S-oxybutynin from oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are 156% and 187%, respectively, compared with oxybutynin. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for R- and S-oxybutynin are summarized in Table 2. The plasma concentration-time profiles for R- and S-oxybutynin are similar in shape; Figure 1 shows the profile for R-oxybutynin. Table 2: Mean (SD) R- and S-Oxybutynin Pharmacokinetic Parameters Following a Single Dose of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 10 mg (n=43) Parameters (units) R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin C max (ng/mL) 1.0 (0.6) 1.8 (1.0) T max (h) 12.7 (5.4) 11.8 (5.3) t 1/2 (h) 13.2 (6.2) 12.4 (6.1) AUC (0-48) (ng•h/mL) 18.4 (10.3) 34.2 (16.9) AUC inf (ng•h/mL) 21.3 (12.2) 39.5 (21.2) Figure 1: Mean R-oxybutynin plasma concentrations following a single dose of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 10 mg and oxybutynin 5 mg administered every 8 hours (n=23 for each treatment). Steady state oxybutynin plasma concentrations are achieved by Day 3 of repeated oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets dosing, with no observed drug accumulation or change in oxybutynin and desethyloxybutynin pharmacokinetic parameters. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets steady state pharmacokinetics were studied in 19 children aged 5-15 years with detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). The children were on oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets total daily dose ranging from 5 to 20 mg (0.10 to 0.77 mg/kg). Sparse sampling technique was used to obtain serum samples. When all available data are normalized to an equivalent of 5 mg per day of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, the mean pharmacokinetic parameters derived for R- and S-oxybutynin and R- and S-desethyloxybutynin are summarized in Table 3. The plasma-time concentration profiles for R- and S-oxybutynin are similar in shape; Figure 2 shows the profile for R-oxybutynin when all available data are normalized to an equivalent of 5 mg per day. Table 3: Mean ±SD R- and S-Oxybutynin and R- and S-Desethyloxybutynin Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Children Aged 5-15 Following Administration of 5 to 20 mg Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets Once Daily (n=19), All Available Data Normalized to an Equivalent of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 5 mg Once Daily R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin R-Desethyloxybutynin S-Desethyloxybutynin C max (ng/mL) T max (h) AUC (ng•h/mL) 0.7 ± 0.4 5.0 12.8 ± 7.0 1.3 ± 0.8 5.0 23.7 ± 14.4 7.8 ± 3.7 5.0 125.1 ± 66.7 4.2 ± 2.3 5.0 73.6 ± 47.7 Figure 2: Mean steady state (±SD) R-oxybutynin plasma concentrations following administration of 5 to 20 mg Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets once daily in children aged 5-15. Plot represents all available data normalized to an equivalent of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablet 5 mg once daily. Food Effects The rate and extent of absorption and metabolism of oxybutynin are similar under fed and fasted conditions. Distribution Oxybutynin is widely distributed in body tissues following systemic absorption. The volume of distribution is 193 L after intravenous administration of 5 mg oxybutynin chloride. Both enantiomers of oxybutynin are highly bound (> 99%) to plasma proteins. Both enantiomers of N-desethyloxybutynin are also highly bound (> 97%) to plasma proteins. The major binding protein is alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. Metabolism Oxybutynin is metabolized primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme systems, particularly CYP3A4 found mostly in the liver and gut wall. Its metabolic products include phenylcyclohexylglycolic acid, which is pharmacologically inactive, and desethyloxybutynin, which is pharmacologically active. Following oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets administration, plasma concentrations of R-and S-desethyloxybutynin are 73% and 92%, respectively, of concentrations observed with oxybutynin. Excretion Oxybutynin is extensively metabolized by the liver, with less than 0.1% of the administered dose excreted unchanged in the urine. Also, less than 0.1% of the administered dose is excreted as the metabolite desethyloxybutynin. Dose Proportionality Pharmacokinetic parameters of oxybutynin and desethyloxybutynin (C max and AUC) following administration of 5-20 mg of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are dose proportional. Use in Specific Populations Pediatric The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended release tablets were evaluated in 19 children aged 5-15 years with detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in these pediatric patients were consistent with those reported for adults (see Tables 2 and 3, and Figures 1 and 2 above). Gender There are no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin in healthy male and female volunteers following administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. Race Available data suggest that there are no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin based on race in healthy volunteers following administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. figure 1 figure 2

Clinical Pharmacology Table

Parameters (units) R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin
Cmax (ng/mL) 1.0 (0.6) 1.8 (1.0)
Tmax (h) 12.7 (5.4) 11.8 (5.3)
t1/2 (h) 13.2 (6.2) 12.4 (6.1)
AUC(0-48) (ng•h/mL) 18.4 (10.3) 34.2 (16.9)
AUCinf (ng•h/mL) 21.3 (12.2) 39.5 (21.2)

Mechanism Of Action

12.1 Mechanism of Action Oxybutynin relaxes bladder smooth muscle. Oxybutynin chloride exerts a direct antispasmodic effect on smooth muscle and inhibits the muscarinic action of acetylcholine on smooth muscle. No blocking effects occur at skeletal neuromuscular junctions or autonomic ganglia (antinicotinic effects). Antimuscarinic activity resides predominantly in the R-isomer. A metabolite, desethyloxybutynin, has pharmacological activity similar to that of oxybutynin in in vitro studies.

Pharmacodynamics

12.2 Pharmacodynamics In patients with conditions characterized by involuntary bladder contractions, cystometric studies have demonstrated that oxybutynin increases bladder (vesical) capacity, diminishes the frequency of uninhibited contractions of the detrusor muscle, and delays the initial desire to void.

Pharmacokinetics

12.3 Pharmacokinetics Absorption Following the first dose of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, oxybutynin plasma concentrations rise for 4 to 6 hours; thereafter steady concentrations are maintained for up to 24 hours, minimizing fluctuations between peak and trough concentrations associated with oxybutynin. The relative bioavailabilities of R- and S-oxybutynin from oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are 156% and 187%, respectively, compared with oxybutynin. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for R- and S-oxybutynin are summarized in Table 2. The plasma concentration-time profiles for R- and S-oxybutynin are similar in shape; Figure 1 shows the profile for R-oxybutynin. Table 2: Mean (SD) R- and S-Oxybutynin Pharmacokinetic Parameters Following a Single Dose of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 10 mg (n=43) Parameters (units) R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin C max (ng/mL) 1.0 (0.6) 1.8 (1.0) T max (h) 12.7 (5.4) 11.8 (5.3) t 1/2 (h) 13.2 (6.2) 12.4 (6.1) AUC (0-48) (ng•h/mL) 18.4 (10.3) 34.2 (16.9) AUC inf (ng•h/mL) 21.3 (12.2) 39.5 (21.2) Figure 1: Mean R-oxybutynin plasma concentrations following a single dose of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 10 mg and oxybutynin 5 mg administered every 8 hours (n=23 for each treatment). Steady state oxybutynin plasma concentrations are achieved by Day 3 of repeated oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets dosing, with no observed drug accumulation or change in oxybutynin and desethyloxybutynin pharmacokinetic parameters. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets steady state pharmacokinetics were studied in 19 children aged 5-15 years with detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). The children were on oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets total daily dose ranging from 5 to 20 mg (0.10 to 0.77 mg/kg). Sparse sampling technique was used to obtain serum samples. When all available data are normalized to an equivalent of 5 mg per day of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, the mean pharmacokinetic parameters derived for R- and S-oxybutynin and R- and S-desethyloxybutynin are summarized in Table 3. The plasma-time concentration profiles for R- and S-oxybutynin are similar in shape; Figure 2 shows the profile for R-oxybutynin when all available data are normalized to an equivalent of 5 mg per day. Table 3: Mean ±SD R- and S-Oxybutynin and R- and S-Desethyloxybutynin Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Children Aged 5-15 Following Administration of 5 to 20 mg Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets Once Daily (n=19), All Available Data Normalized to an Equivalent of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets 5 mg Once Daily R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin R-Desethyloxybutynin S-Desethyloxybutynin C max (ng/mL) T max (h) AUC (ng•h/mL) 0.7 ± 0.4 5.0 12.8 ± 7.0 1.3 ± 0.8 5.0 23.7 ± 14.4 7.8 ± 3.7 5.0 125.1 ± 66.7 4.2 ± 2.3 5.0 73.6 ± 47.7 Figure 2: Mean steady state (±SD) R-oxybutynin plasma concentrations following administration of 5 to 20 mg Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablets once daily in children aged 5-15. Plot represents all available data normalized to an equivalent of Oxybutynin Chloride Extended-Release Tablet 5 mg once daily. Food Effects The rate and extent of absorption and metabolism of oxybutynin are similar under fed and fasted conditions. Distribution Oxybutynin is widely distributed in body tissues following systemic absorption. The volume of distribution is 193 L after intravenous administration of 5 mg oxybutynin chloride. Both enantiomers of oxybutynin are highly bound (> 99%) to plasma proteins. Both enantiomers of N-desethyloxybutynin are also highly bound (> 97%) to plasma proteins. The major binding protein is alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. Metabolism Oxybutynin is metabolized primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme systems, particularly CYP3A4 found mostly in the liver and gut wall. Its metabolic products include phenylcyclohexylglycolic acid, which is pharmacologically inactive, and desethyloxybutynin, which is pharmacologically active. Following oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets administration, plasma concentrations of R-and S-desethyloxybutynin are 73% and 92%, respectively, of concentrations observed with oxybutynin. Excretion Oxybutynin is extensively metabolized by the liver, with less than 0.1% of the administered dose excreted unchanged in the urine. Also, less than 0.1% of the administered dose is excreted as the metabolite desethyloxybutynin. Dose Proportionality Pharmacokinetic parameters of oxybutynin and desethyloxybutynin (C max and AUC) following administration of 5-20 mg of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are dose proportional. Use in Specific Populations Pediatric The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended release tablets were evaluated in 19 children aged 5-15 years with detrusor overactivity associated with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida). The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in these pediatric patients were consistent with those reported for adults (see Tables 2 and 3, and Figures 1 and 2 above). Gender There are no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin in healthy male and female volunteers following administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. Race Available data suggest that there are no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin based on race in healthy volunteers following administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. figure 1 figure 2

Pharmacokinetics Table

Parameters (units) R-Oxybutynin S-Oxybutynin
Cmax (ng/mL) 1.0 (0.6) 1.8 (1.0)
Tmax (h) 12.7 (5.4) 11.8 (5.3)
t1/2 (h) 13.2 (6.2) 12.4 (6.1)
AUC(0-48) (ng•h/mL) 18.4 (10.3) 34.2 (16.9)
AUCinf (ng•h/mL) 21.3 (12.2) 39.5 (21.2)

Effective Time

20230906

Version

1

Dosage Forms And Strengths

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets USP are available as 5, 10 and 15 mg tablets for oral use: 5 mg: Pale yellow colored, round, biconvex tablets with orifice and "P 5" imprinted with black ink. 10 mg: Pink colored, round, biconvex tablets with orifice and "P 10" imprinted with black ink. 15 mg: Grey colored, round, biconvex tablets with orifice and "P 15" imprinted with black ink. Extended release tablets 5 mg, 10 mg and 15 mg ( 3 )

Spl Product Data Elements

Oxybutynin Chloride Extended Release Oxybutynin Chloride OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN POLYETHYLENE OXIDE 7000000 POLYETHYLENE OXIDE 200000 HYPROMELLOSE 2910 (3 MPA.S) SODIUM CHLORIDE BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENE FERROSOFERRIC OXIDE SILICON DIOXIDE MAGNESIUM STEARATE CELLULOSE ACETATE POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 3350 TITANIUM DIOXIDE LACTOSE MONOHYDRATE TRIACETIN SHELLAC HYPROMELLOSE 2910 (6 MPA.S) PROPYLENE GLYCOL FERRIC OXIDE RED P10

Carcinogenesis And Mutagenesis And Impairment Of Fertility

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility Carcinogenesis A 24-month study in rats at dosages of oxybutynin chloride of 20, 80, and 160 mg/kg/day showed no evidence of carcinogenicity. These doses are approximately 6, 25, and 50 times the maximum human exposure, based on a human equivalent dose taking into account normalization of body surface area. Mutagenesis Oxybutynin chloride showed no increase of mutagenic activity when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pompholiciformis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Salmonella typhimurium test systems. Impairment of Fertility No impairment of fertility was seen in rats at dosages up to 75 mg/kg/day (24 times the MRHD on a mg/m 2 basis) when administered for 2 weeks prior to mating in females and for 9 weeks prior to mating in males.

Nonclinical Toxicology

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY 13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility Carcinogenesis A 24-month study in rats at dosages of oxybutynin chloride of 20, 80, and 160 mg/kg/day showed no evidence of carcinogenicity. These doses are approximately 6, 25, and 50 times the maximum human exposure, based on a human equivalent dose taking into account normalization of body surface area. Mutagenesis Oxybutynin chloride showed no increase of mutagenic activity when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pompholiciformis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Salmonella typhimurium test systems. Impairment of Fertility No impairment of fertility was seen in rats at dosages up to 75 mg/kg/day (24 times the MRHD on a mg/m 2 basis) when administered for 2 weeks prior to mating in females and for 9 weeks prior to mating in males.

Application Number

ANDA206121

Brand Name

Oxybutynin Chloride Extended Release

Generic Name

Oxybutynin Chloride

Product Ndc

50090-6673

Product Type

HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG

Route

ORAL

Package Label Principal Display Panel

OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE Label Image

Information For Patients

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION Patients should be informed that oxybutynin may produce angioedema that could result in life threatening airway obstruction. Patients should be advised to promptly discontinue oxybutynin therapy and seek immediate medical attention if they experience swelling of the tongue, edema of the laryngopharynx, or difficulty breathing. Patients should be informed that anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) agents such as oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets, may produce clinically significant adverse reactions related to anticholinergic activity such as: Urinary retention and constipation Heat prostration due to decreased sweating. Heat prostration can occur when anticholinergic medicines are administered in the presence of high environmental temperature. Patients should be informed that anticholinergic medicines such as oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets may produce drowsiness (somnolence), dizziness or blurred vision. Patients should be advised to exercise caution in decisions to engage in potentially dangerous activities until oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets effects have been determined. Patients should be informed that alcohol may enhance the drowsiness caused by anticholinergic agents such as oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets. Patients should be informed that oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets should be swallowed whole with the aid of liquids. Patients should not chew, divide, or crush tablets. The medication is contained within a nonabsorbable shell designed to release the drug at a controlled rate. The tablet shell is eliminated from the body; patients should not be concerned if they occasionally notice in their stool something that looks like a tablet. Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets should be taken at approximately the same time each day. For more information call Rising Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at 1-(866)-562-4597. Manufactured by: Unique Pharmaceutical Laboratories (A Div. of J. B. Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals Ltd.) Mumbai, 400 030, India. Distributed by: Rising Pharmaceuticals, Inc. East Brunswick, NJ 08816 Revised: 06/2023 136762 rising-logo

Clinical Studies

14 CLINICAL STUDIES Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were evaluated for the treatment of patients with overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency in three controlled efficacy studies. The majority of patients were Caucasian (89.0%) and female (91.9%) with a mean age of 59 years (range, 18 to 98 years). Entry criteria required that patients have urge or mixed incontinence (with a predominance of urge) as evidenced by ≥ 6 urge incontinence episodes per week and ≥ 10 micturitions per day. Study 1 was a fixed-dose escalation design, whereas the other two studies used a dose-adjustment design in which each patient’s final dose was adjusted to a balance between improvement of incontinence symptoms and tolerability of side effects. All three studies included patients known to be responsive to oxybutynin or other anticholinergic medications, and these patients were maintained on a final dose for up to 2 weeks. The efficacy results for the three controlled trials are presented in the following Tables 4, 5, and 6 and Figures 3, 4, and 5. Table 4: Number of Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week (Study 1) Study 1 n Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets n Placebo Mean Baseline 34 15.9 16 20.9 Mean (SD) Change from Baseline† 34 -15.8 (8.9) 16 -7.6 (8.6) 95% Confidence Interval for Difference (-13.6, -2.8) * (Oxybutynin chloride extended- release tablets – Placebo) *The difference between Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets and placebo was statistically significant. †Covariate adjusted mean with missing observations set to baseline values Figure 3: Mean Change (± SD) in Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week from Baseline (Study 1) *The difference between Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets and placebo was statistically significant. Table 5: Number of Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week (Study 2) Study 2 n Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets n oxybutynin Mean Baseline 53 27.6 52 23.0 Mean (SD) Change from Baseline† 53 -17.6 (11.9) 52 -19.4 (11.9) 95% Confidence Interval for Difference (-2.8, 6.5) (Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets – oxybutynin) †Covariate adjusted mean with missing observations set to baseline values Figure 4: Mean Change (±SD) in Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week from Baseline (Study 2) Table 6: Number of Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week (Study 3) Study 3 n Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets n oxybutynin Mean Baseline 111 18.9 115 19.5 Mean (SD) Change from Baseline† 111 -14.5 (8.7) 115 -13.8 (8.6) 95% Confidence Interval for Difference (Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets – oxybutynin) (-3.0, 1.6) ** **The difference between Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets and oxybutynin fulfilled the criteria for comparable efficacy. †Covariate adjusted mean with missing observations set to baseline values Figure 5: Mean Change (±SD) in Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week from Baseline (Study 3) **The difference between Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets and oxybutynin fulfilled the criteria for comparable efficacy. Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

Clinical Studies Table

Table 4: Number of Urge Urinary Incontinence Episodes Per Week (Study 1)
Study 1 n Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets n Placebo
Mean Baseline 34 15.9 16 20.9
Mean (SD) Change from Baseline† 34 -15.8 (8.9) 16 -7.6 (8.6)
95% Confidence Interval for Difference (-13.6, -2.8) *
(Oxybutynin chloride extended- release tablets – Placebo)

Geriatric Use

8.5 Geriatric Use The rate and severity of anticholinergic effects reported by patients less than 65 years old and those 65 years and older were similar. The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were similar in all patients studied (up to 78 years of age).

Pediatric Use

8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and efficacy of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were studied in 60 children in a 24-week, open-label, non-randomized trial. Patients were aged 6-15 years, all had symptoms of detrusor overactivity in association with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida), all used clean intermittent catheterization, and all were current users of oxybutynin chloride. Study results demonstrated that administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets 5 to 20 mg/day was associated with an increase from baseline in mean urine volume per catheterization from 108 mL to 136 mL, an increase from baseline in mean urine volume after morning awakening from 148 mL to 189 mL, and an increase from baseline in the mean percentage of catheterizations without a leaking episode from 34% to 51%. Urodynamic results were consistent with clinical results. Administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets resulted in an increase from baseline in mean maximum cystometric capacity from 185 mL to 254 mL, a decrease from baseline in mean detrusor pressure at maximum cystometric capacity from 44 cm H 2 O to 33 cm H 2 O, and a reduction in the percentage of patients demonstrating uninhibited detrusor contractions (of at least 15 cm H 2 O) from 60% to 28%. The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in these patients were consistent with those reported for adults [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] . Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are not recommended in pediatric patients who cannot swallow the tablet whole without chewing, dividing, or crushing, or in children under the age of 6.

Pregnancy

8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary There are no adequate data on oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown.

Use In Specific Populations

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pediatric Use: Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are not recommended in pediatric patients who cannot swallow the tablet whole without chewing, dividing or crushing, or in children under the age of 6 years. ( 8.4 ) Renal or Hepatic Impairment: There have been no studies conducted in patients with renal or hepatic impairment. ( 8.6 , 8.7 ) 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary There are no adequate data on oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There are no data on the presence of oxybutynin in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets or from the underlying maternal condition. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and efficacy of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were studied in 60 children in a 24-week, open-label, non-randomized trial. Patients were aged 6-15 years, all had symptoms of detrusor overactivity in association with a neurological condition (e.g., spina bifida), all used clean intermittent catheterization, and all were current users of oxybutynin chloride. Study results demonstrated that administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets 5 to 20 mg/day was associated with an increase from baseline in mean urine volume per catheterization from 108 mL to 136 mL, an increase from baseline in mean urine volume after morning awakening from 148 mL to 189 mL, and an increase from baseline in the mean percentage of catheterizations without a leaking episode from 34% to 51%. Urodynamic results were consistent with clinical results. Administration of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets resulted in an increase from baseline in mean maximum cystometric capacity from 185 mL to 254 mL, a decrease from baseline in mean detrusor pressure at maximum cystometric capacity from 44 cm H 2 O to 33 cm H 2 O, and a reduction in the percentage of patients demonstrating uninhibited detrusor contractions (of at least 15 cm H 2 O) from 60% to 28%. The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in these patients were consistent with those reported for adults [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] . Oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets are not recommended in pediatric patients who cannot swallow the tablet whole without chewing, dividing, or crushing, or in children under the age of 6. 8.5 Geriatric Use The rate and severity of anticholinergic effects reported by patients less than 65 years old and those 65 years and older were similar. The pharmacokinetics of oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets were similar in all patients studied (up to 78 years of age). 8.6 Renal Impairment There were no studies conducted with oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in patients with renal impairment. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment There were no studies conducted with oxybutynin chloride extended-release tablets in patients with hepatic impairment.

How Supplied

16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING Product: 50090-6673 NDC: 50090-6673-0 90 TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE in a BOTTLE

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