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Journal

Circulating citrullinated vimentin fragments reflect disease burden in Ankylosing Spondylitis and has prognostic capacity for radiographic progression

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Published:25th Mar 2020
Objective: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is considered a seronegative disease indicated by absent or low levels of antibodies against citrullinated proteins. We evaluated whether a citrullinated and MMP degraded fragment of vimentin (VICM) could be a prognostic biomarker in AS. Methods: Serum VICM was measured in samples of healthy controls (n=35), controls with RA (n=47) and AS (n=201) patients. Optimal cut-off for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was determined by ROC analysis. Baseline and 2-year spinal radiographs were available on 118 AS patients, scored using mSASSS. We assessed correlations with patient demographics (age, disease duration), disease activity (BASDAI, CRP), and severity (mSASSS) using Spearman's rho. The independent association of VICM with 2-year radiographic progression, defined as mSASSS change>0 or the development of a new syndesmophyte, was analyzed by multivariate regression. Results: Both RA and AS had significantly higher levels of degraded VICM than controls (p<0.001). as patients with the highest level of vicm had the largest burden of disease (p><0.001), i.e. highest msasss score and basdai. vicm was significantly and independently associated with radiographic progression after 2 years (?="0.69," p="0.0005)." patients with both high vicm and a high baseline msasss had the highest risk for radiographic progression (or for msasss change="13," new syndesmophyte="32)" and 67% of these had progression. conclusions: serum vicm may be of prognostic value in as. our data also suggests that citrullination may be relevant to the pathogenesis of as. � 2012 american college of rheumatology.>

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