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Cancer-Associated Thrombosis
Declaration of sponsorship Pfizer and Bristol Myers Squibb

VTE Risk in Cancer

Declaration of sponsorship Pfizer and Bristol Myers Squibb
Ongoing cutting-edge research provides insights into the risk of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), the pathophysiology of the disease and how risk stratification is essential to guide treatment choices.

Cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT) is a common cause of death amongst the cancer population. 

The increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) and bleeding complications in patients with cancer makes anticoagulant treatment and management of VTE challenging1

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The pathophysiology of VTE includes general and biological risk factors, common to cancer and non-cancer patients, however in patients with malignancy there are an additional number of disease-specific factors, which render the pathogenesis unique11.

The thrombotic generation process in the cancer patient is distinct from the non-cancer population.

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The incidence of VTE increases exponentially with the increase in presented risk factors. 

A thorough risk score system and risk stratification is essential to help physicians plan particular prophylactic approaches for patients prone to develop the disease12

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References

  1. Agnelli, G. et al. Apixaban for the treatment of venous thromboembolism associated with cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 2020;382:1599–1607
  2. Kushner, A., West, DO, W. P. & Pillarisetty, L. S. Virchow Triad. StatPearls (StatPearls Publishing, 2019).
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